New CCC researchers – University of Copenhagen

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Centre for Communication and Computing > News > New CCC researchers

09 October 2014

New CCC researchers

The Centre for Communication and Computing is proud to welcome several new researchers:

Niels Ole Finnemann

Niels Ole Finnemann

Niels Ole Finnemann is a new Professor from the Royal School of Library and Information Science (RSLIS). He was formerly Professor MSO at Aarhus University; Head of Center for Cultural Studies, 1996-1999; Head of Center for Internet Studies, 2000-2010; and Head of NetLab, a section of DigHumLab-Denmark, 2012-2014. He is currently a member of the Advisory Board of EU-DASISH; a national representative in the EU COST 1104 Action on Web-based Data Collection Methods; and has formerly received numerous research-grants. He was a member of the Norwegian Research Council’s Committee for Social Sciences 2010-2013.  

Since the 1980’s, his research has focused on digital media and their role both in the overall history of media and in more narrow meso- and micro perspectives. Since 2000 his main focus has been Internet studies, including issues on how to archive and study these significant, complex and fast growing contemporary history sources. He has written numerous articles in peer reviewed journals and contributed to various scholarly anthologies. His work is based on an un-dogmatic idea of co-evolutionary media theory. He has participated in projects concerned with the building of the National Danish Internet Archive. Currently his work is focused on developing a concept of “networked digital media” to supplement former notions of stand-alone computers. His current work also focuses on analyzing the increasingly greater number of different types of digital materials produced and how such differences might influence the building of research infrastructures. Niels Ole Finnemann is giving his inaugural lecture on 21 November 2014.

Alesia Ann Zuccala

Alesia Ann Zuccala

Alesia Ann Zuccala is a graduate (PhD) of the University of Toronto, Faculty of Information Studies and now holds a new appointment as Assistant Professor at RSLIS. Previously, she has held research appointments at the Science System Assessment Unit of the Rathenau Institute in Den Haag; the Center for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University; and the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation at the University of Amsterdam.  Dr. Zuccala's work focuses primarily on scholarly communication and citation patterns in academic research, and her current interest is to develop new approaches of evaluating research outputs in the humanities. She has contributed both quantitative and qualitative-oriented research to a variety of international journals including Scientometrics, Information Research, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, and the Annual Review of Information Science and Technology.

Anders Søgaard

Anders Søgaard

Anders Søgaard (PhD, Dr. Phil.) is an Associate Professor at the Centre for Language Technology as well as a member of the Young Academy under the Royal Danish Society of Sciences and Letters. He holds an ERC Starting Grant as well as several grants from the Danish Research Council and private foundations. He previously worked as a Senior Researcher at the University of Potsdam. His research interests lie in the intersection of natural language processing and machine learning with a focus on semi-supervised learning and transfer learning.

Troels Fibæk Bertel

Troels Fibæk Bertel

Troels Fibæk Bertel is a postdoctoral researcher in the ”Meaning across Media” project at the Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, the Film and Media Studies section. The topic of his ongoing postdoc research is practices of mundane citizenship, subactivism and protest across media and contexts among individuals living with chronic illness who have, in various ways, been caught up in the Danish municipal system. He has also published in the field of mobile communication, a subject that remains a strong research interest.