Micro, Meso and Macro Challenges to Collaborative Healthcare Delivery: Insights from Canada – University of Copenhagen

Micro, Meso and Macro Challenges to Collaborative Healthcare Delivery: Insights from Canada

– The Centre for Communication and Computing, the Danish Centre for Health Informatics (DaCHI) and the Danish Society of Medical Informatics (DSMI) are hosting a talk by …

Craig Kuziemsky, PhD
Associate Professor and Director, MSc in Health Systems Program
Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa

The talk is open and free – no registration is required. We look forward to see you there! For further information, please contact Kasper Rasmussen.

Time: Friday 22 March 2013, 13:00-14:00
Place: University of Copenhagen, Southern Campus, room 24.0.11 (Njalsgade 128, building 24)

Abstract
Concepts such as collaborative healthcare delivery and continuity of care have raised attention to the need for an integrated healthcare system. However integration is challenging in that there are several factors that must be coordinated in order to design integrated healthcare solutions. Craig Kuziemsky’s research focuses on developing new approaches for modeling and designing information and communication technologies to support collaborative healthcare delivery. In this presentation Kuziemsky will discuss his current research that is studying collaborative care delivery at two levels. The first level is the micro level where he has been modeling healthcare delivery from the perspective of individual providers and teams. This research includes studying how providers communicate and collaborate with each other as part synchronous and asynchronous healthcare delivery and the role that concepts such as awareness and common ground play in supporting collaboration. The second level is looking at collaboration at the meso (organizational) and macro (health system) levels. Kuziemsky will also provide an introduction to the Canadian Healthcare System and discuss some of the cultural considerations within it. Finally he will discuss opportunities for collaboration with Danish e-health and health informatics groups. 

Biography, Dr. Craig Kuziemsky
Craig Kuziemsky, PhD, is an Associate Professor and director of the Master of Science Health Systems Program in the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa. He joined the University of Ottawa in 2007. He completed his PhD in Health Information Science from the University of Victoria in 2006. He also received Bachelor of Commerce and Science Degrees from the University of Alberta in 1993 and 2000 respectively. His research interests include modeling and designing information systems to support collaborative healthcare teams. He is also researching healthcare interoperability with a focus on process interoperability. He has published his research in journals such as Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Methods of Information in Medicine and International Journal of Medical Informatics and conferences such as the International Conference on Software Engineering and the American Medical Informatics Association annual symposium.
Craig’s research focuses on developing new approaches for modeling collaborative healthcare delivery so we can better design information and communication technology to support collaboration. His research is tackling this problem at two levels.
The first level is the micro level where he is modeling healthcare delivery from the perspective of the micro level relationships between providers and teams. That research includes modeling how providers communicate and collaborate with each other as part synchronous and asynchronous healthcare delivery. For example he has developed models of awareness and common ground and looked at the role they play in collaboration and how they can inform HIS design. This research will have implications for the design and evaluation of ICTs to support collaborative healthcare teams and will also support education, human resource and policy development to support teams.
The second level is looking at collaboration from a meso or organizational level. Craig’s research at this level makes a key distinction between data and process interoperability. Data interoperability allows two computer systems to communicate with one another such as through technical or terminological solutions. However that does not guarantee that the people and business processes using the computer system are interoperable. Interoperability at the process level is crucial for developing solutions to support collaborative care delivery. To date his research has identified process interoperability needs such as workflow, knowledge, collaborative, and information management, and then applied those needs to different technical implementations.